Often asked: Where To Go To Get Checked For Testicular Cancer When You Don’t Have A Family Doctor?

Where do you go to get checked for testicular cancer?

If your doctor suspects you could have testicular cancer, you may be referred to a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating conditions of the urinary tract and male reproductive system (urologist) or a doctor who specializes in treating cancer (oncologist).

How can you test for testicular cancer at home?

Starting with one side, gently roll the scrotum with your fingers to feel the surface of the testicle.

  1. Check for any lumps, bumps or unusual features. Contrary to what many assume, cancerous tumors typically aren’t painful.
  2. Make note of any changes in size over time.
  3. Be aware of any dull soreness or heaviness.

What kind of doctor do you see for your balls?

Testicular pain, lump or masses: When testicular pain is persistent and does not go away within two weeks, it is time to see a Urologist. Any masses, firmness or nodules on the testicles should be examined by a urologic specialist, due to the chance of testicular cancer.

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How does a doctor check for testicular cancer?

Key points about diagnosing testicular cancer Your doctor will examine your testicles and scrotum for a lump and swelling. An ultrasound will create a picture of your scrotum and testicles. This is a quick and painless scan. Blood tests will look for chemicals (tumour markers) in your blood that may indicate cancer.

What are 5 warning signs of testicular cancer?

Testicular Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

  • A painless lump or swelling on either testicle.
  • Pain, discomfort, or numbness in a testicle or the scrotum, with or without swelling.
  • Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.
  • Dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin.
  • Sudden buildup of fluid in the scrotum.
  • Breast tenderness or growth.

How long can you live with untreated testicular cancer?

The general 5-year survival rate for men with testicular cancer is 95%. This means that 95 men out of every 100 men diagnosed with testicular cancer will live at least 5 years after diagnosis. The survival rate is higher for people diagnosed with early-stage cancer and lower for those with later-stage cancer.

Can urine test detect testicular cancer?

Non-seminomas often raise AFP and/or HCG levels. Over the counter urinary pregnancy tests do check for HCG levels in the urine but are not reliable tests for testicular cancer.

How fast does testicular cancer spread?

Seminomas tend to grow and spread more slowly than nonseminomas, which are more common, accounting for roughly 60 percent of all testicular cancers. How quickly a cancer spreads will vary from patient to patient.

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Why is my left testicle hurting?

Pain in the testicles can be caused by minor injuries to the area. However, if you’re experiencing pain in the testicle, you need to have your symptoms evaluated. Pain in the scrotum can be the result of serious conditions like testicular torsion or a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

Can sperm build up cause pain?

Common Causes Infection: The testicle and epididymis, the part of the testicle that stores sperm, can sometimes become infected, causing pain and swelling that starts quickly and gets worse. Fluid Buildup: An injury or infection can cause fluid to build up around the testicle, causing painful swelling.

Why do my balls and back hurt?

When testicle pain occurs along with lower back pain, it can indicate an underlying condition. Possible causes include kidney stones, infections, and spinal problems. People should see a doctor if the pain is severe, does not go away, or occurs along with other concerning symptoms.

Can I go straight to a urologist?

Sometimes a patient will be referred to a urologist by another health care professional, as Valerie was. But often people go straight to a urologist for treatment. Your primary care doctor may be able to treat some minor urologic issues.

Does pain in testicle mean cancer?

Pain, swelling or lumps in your testicle or groin area may be a sign or symptom of testicular cancer or other medical conditions requiring treatment. Signs and symptoms of testicular cancer include: A lump or enlargement in either testicle. A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.

What can be mistaken for testicular cancer?

More common than testicular cancer is epididymitis, which is inflammation of the epididymis, a tubular structure next to the testicle where sperm mature. About 600,000 men get it each year, most commonly between ages 19 and 35.

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What are the stages of testicular cancer?

There are 3 stages of testicular cancer: stages I, II, and III (1, 2, and 3). The stage provides a common way of describing how advanced the cancer is so that doctors can work together to plan the best treatment. Stage I is the least advanced or earlier stage, and stage III is the most advanced or later stage.

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